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Stop Smoking

Get help quitting

 

No matter how long you've smoked for, no matter how many cigarettes you smoke a day, your health will start to improve as soon as you quit.

Some health benefits are immediate, some are longer-term, but what matters is that it's never too late.

The dangers of smoking

Your Lungs and Breathing
Smoking causes serious damage to your lungs which affects your breathing and how active you can be. Smoking makes dealing with everything from coughs and colds to pneumonia and lung cancer harder.

84% of lung cancer deaths are caused by smoking.

Blood Circulation
Poisons in cigarettes enter your blood and make it thicker, increases your blood pressure meaning your heart has to pump harder than normal, reduces the amount of blood that reaches your organs and increases the chances of heart attack or stroke.

Your Heart
Smoking doubles your risk of having a heart attack and you’re twice as likely to die from a heart attack compared to someone who has never smoked. If you quit smoking your risk is reduced by half after only one year, and if you can quit for good after 15 years your risk is similar to a non-smoker.

Your Stomach
Smokers have an increased chance of getting stomach cancer or ulcers, and smoking is a significant risk factor for kidney cancer.

How You Look

If you smoke, your skin will age prematurely making it look a dull and yellow-grey colour. It also increases the likelihood of getting wrinkles.

Bone Health
Smoking affects your bones and can cause them to become weak. Women need to be especially careful, as they are more likely to suffer from brittle bones (osteoporosis) than women who don’t smoke.

Your Brain
Smoking can increase the risk of stroke by at least 50%, and aneurysms (where a blood vessel in the brain bursts), both cause brain damage and can be fatal.


Your Lungs and Breathing
Smoking causes serious damage to your lungs which affects your breathing and how active you can be. Smoking makes dealing with everything from coughs and colds to pneumonia and lung cancer harder. 84% of lung cancer deaths are caused by smoking.


Mouth and Throat
Smoking can cause bad breath, discoloured teeth and gum disease which risks losing your teeth.

93% of oropharyngeal cancers (cancer in part of the throat) are caused by smoking.

Reproductive Health
For women, smoking can reduce fertility making it harder to get pregnant. It also increases your risk of cervical cancer. Smoking while pregnant can lead to miscarriage, premature birth, stillbirth and illness, and it increases the risk of cot death by at least 25%.

In men smoking can make it harder to get an erection, lowers the number and quality of sperm your produce and causes testicular cancer.

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Get help quitting

If you want to stop smoking, several different treatments are available from shops, pharmacies and on prescription to help you beat your addiction and reduce withdrawal symptoms.

The best treatment for you will depend on your personal preference, your age, whether you're pregnant or breastfeeding and any medical conditions you have. Book an appointment with the stop smoking nurse or speak to your pharmacist.

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A new stop smoking service is now available, it is called One YOU, they will provide: 

  • Direct clinic delivery by their staff across a range of community locations
  • Supporting stop smoking advisors in GP Practices and Pharmacies (they will dedicate a 1.0FTE team member to supporting advisors in primary care)
  • Convenient telephone and digital support for clients who can’t make or don’t need face to face appointments

You can contact them on 01737 652168 or email them at s.smoking@nhs.net

 

 



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